Eager Beaver Nursery, Inc.
Landscape & Irrigation: Design, Construction,
and Maintenance - SINCE 1978
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F A Q

The employees at Eager Beaver Nursery, Inc. make it a priority to be available to answer questions that customers may have. Please take a look at some of our frequently asked questions below.

  1. Can I schedule maintenance service for once a month?
  2. What if I want to cancel my maintenance service for the winter?
  3. What kind of fertilizer should be used for my lawn and how much should be applied?
  4. What is the best way to control weeds in my yard?
  5. Are there any lawn diseases that I should be worried about?

Can I schedule maintenance service for once a month?

We have found that typically customers want to reduce their maintenance schedule to once a month to reduce costs. We sincerely understand that need, however, because of the reduced weekly or bi-weekly time on the job site, crews are required to stay longer on that one day during the month. This means that instead of work being divided throughout the month, it is all being done in one day so the savings are either small or canceled out. Our top priorities are customer satisfaction and the consistent quality of the job. We do not recommend once a month maintenance because with longer lengths of time between visits, property conditions can degrade. We do not feel that this best represents the quality of work that Eager Beaver Nursery, Inc. is proud to put their name to. Therefore, we can provide a weekly or bi-weekly maintenance schedule.

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What if I want to cancel my maintenance service for the winter?

You are welcome to cancel your services for the winter and continue again in the spring. However, there are a couple of things to consider. If you decide to cancel for the winter, you are considered a returning "new" customer and will be billed at current rates (only if rates have changed) regardless of your previous rate. Also, we want you to realize that there are many things that should be done during the winter months to keep your yard healthy. Some examples are deciduous pruning, applying dormant spray, lawn aeration, and pressure washing. Also, keep in mind that some of these tasks can only be done in the winter and other tasks cannot be squeezed in during the busy growing season.

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What kind of fertilizer should be used for my lawn and how much should be applied?

Use 25-5-10 slow release fertilizer and approximately 7 pounds per 1,000 square feet of lawn. Make applications around: March 1st, April 15th, June 1st, September 1st, and October 1st. If the lawn is not irrigated during the summer, omit the June and September applications. If the lawn is heavily irrigated and/or is planted in very light soil, you may wish to do one extra application in mid July. Remember that fertilizer applications not only darken the color of your turf, they also stimulate more rapid growth which will require more frequent mowing with a well sharpened blade. In addition to fertilizer, you should plan to apply lime at 50 pound per 1,000 square feet every couple of years.

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What is the best way to control weeds in my yard?

For most broadleaf weeds, a once-per-spring application of a liquid lawn herbicide mix or weed-and-feed granular product containing 2,4-d and Dicamba should do the trick. For more difficult weed problems, or more sensitive areas, you may want to consider the herbicide "Confront". See our field staff if you have specific questions about weed control. For grassy weeds in your lawn you have two options. You can use a pre-emergent herbicide such as "Prograss" or "Ronster" to prevent the seeds of these grasses from getting started, or you can use "Roundup" to kill the weed grasses after they are established. You will need to replant the area after using "Roundup". The most important factor in controlling weeds in a lawn is keeping the lawn itself healthy so that it can compete and crowd out weeds. A healthy lawn requires adequate fertility, proper mowing, and proper irrigation.

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Are there any lawn diseases that I should be worried about?

There are several fungal diseases which attack turf grasses in our wet climate, but the most common are "red-thread", which can usually be identified by a pink patch in the turf, and "rust", which causes leaf blades to have an orange, "rusty" color. If you have a problem with these, you may want to apply fungicides beginning around mid-April on a two-week interval until June when the weather becomes a little drier. The fungicides "Fore", "Daconil", and "Bayleton" are all effective and should be used in rotation. Just as in weed control, disease control is most effective in lawns which are maintained properly with good fertilizer, watering, and mowing practices.

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